John Malcom’s “The Case For the Smarter Sentencing Act”

John Malcom, Director of the Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, and Ed Gilbertson and Sherry Lindberg Gilbertson Senior Legal Fellow at the The Heritage Foundation, authors “The Case For the Smarter Sentencing Act” for the Federal Sentencing Reporter.

Click here to view the article.

J.C. Watts: Oklahoma must think outside the cell

J.C. Watts, Right on Crime signatory, chairman of the J.C. Watts Companies, and former representative of Oklahoma’s Fourth Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives, authored an article for Tulsa World on why the Sooner state’s criminal justice system is ripe for reform.

“As Oklahoma considers reopening prisons to accommodate a burgeoning inmate population, the time is ripe for state leaders to apply their principles of limited government and personal responsibility to criminal justice reform.” Click here to read more.

In Illinois Legislature, A Culture Change On Criminal Sentencing

ROC policy analyst Derek Cohen discusses the changing climate of Illinois’ criminal justice system with NPR’s “Northern Public Radio.”

“Prison is for the people that need to be incapacitated while they receive rehabilitation or while they receive their punishment…It’s almost a case of: it took Nixon to go to China, (and) it took Texas to say this needs to stop right now.”

MacIver Institute’s Brett Healy: Evidence clearly backs cutting incarceration hold

Brett Healy, President of the MacIver Institute in Wisconsin, authored a letter to the editor of The Cap Times in response to Ken Cuccinelli and Deborah Daniels’ article “Less incarceration could lead to less crime.”

Dear Editor: Prison is unquestionably the proper place for violent and repeat offenders, and long sentences for such dangerous felons will always be worth their hefty cost.

But as Ken Cuccinelli and Deborah Daniels correctly argued in their recent piece, millions of lower level offenders can be effectively sanctioned in other ways — without compromising public safety.

Using research to guide their efforts, a growing list of states — from Texas and Georgia to Mississippi and South Dakota — have reformed their correctional and sentencing systems to expand the use of prison alternatives. Such reforms, adopted with overwhelming bipartisan support, are not only saving states money but also reducing recidivism, all while holding offenders accountable and keeping communities safe.

Those who question such a strategy should take note of this compelling fact, reported recently by the Pew Charitable Trusts: States that have cut their imprisonment rates have experienced a greater crime drop than those that increased incarceration.

It’s hard to quarrel with evidence like that.

Brett Healy

President, John K. MacIver Institute for Public Policy


Marc Levin’s Charleston Gazette letter to the editor

ROC policy director Marc Levin authored a letter to the editor of the Charleson Gazette congratulating West Virginia policymakers for implementing cost-effective juvenile justice reforms that will also increase public safety.

Editor:

Congratulations to leaders in West Virginia for kicking off a data-driven process to examine the costs and outcomes of their juvenile justice system. Across the country, conservatives are supporting policymakers who endeavor to take a hard look at corrections policy to address wasteful spending and improve results in public safety.

This conservative lens is especially vital when approaching juvenile justice policy. It is not only about being the best stewards of taxpayer dollars, but also about keeping families together. That’s why national conservatives, such as Jeb Bush, Newt Gingrich and Grover Norquist, have joined the Right on Crime movement to support states looking to maximize system efficiency, and keep youth accountable.

Years of research informs the best way to achieve less juvenile crime with fewer taxpayer dollars, but only West Virginia leaders and policy makers can review the data and come up with a solution that works for their state. We applaud the leaders for committing to this process that is proven to both get youth back on track and provide relief to taxpayers.

Marc Levin
Policy Director, Right on Crime
Austin, Texas

Marc Levin appears on YNN’s Capital Tonight

ROC policy director Marc Levin discusses ways we can reduce prison population with YNN’s Capital Tonight.

Cuccinelli, Daniels: “Less incarceration could lead to less crime”

In their co-authored article for Washington Post, Right on Crime signatories Ken Cuccinelli and Deborah Daniels discuss how less incarceration could lead to less crime, and an increase in public safety.

“As conservatives with backgrounds in law enforcement, we embraced the orthodoxy that more incarceration invariably meant less crime, no matter the offense or the danger posed by its perpetrator. But crime rates have been falling since the early 1990s, and a growing body of research combined with the compelling results of reforms in many states prove it is time to adjust our approach.”

Click here to read more.

Mike Klein: “What We’ve Got Here is Failure to Communicate”

“What we’ve got here is failure to communicate.” Anyone of a certain generation – yeah, that would be my generation – will recognize that famous line from “Cool Hand Luke,” the 1967 film about southern prison warden Strother Martin and his young prisoner Paul Newman. Eight little words strung together became one of the most famous lines ever spoken in American film history.

Click here to read more.

“Feds Authorize New Georgia Juvenile Justice Reform Dollars”

Federal juvenile justice officials have noticed Georgia’s aggressive reforms and must like what they see because Washington is offering to pony up hundreds of thousands of new dollars to help the state implement ongoing juvenile reforms. On Monday the U.S. Justice Department said it could make up to $600,000 available this year, with similar offers in Hawaii and Kentucky.

Click here to read more from Mike Klein of the Georgia Public Policy Foundation.

Ken Blackwell: “When Father’s Day cards go to jail”

Right on Crime signatory and senior fellow for family empowerment at the Family Research Council Ken Blackwell writes in USA Today: “Given the heavy toll incarcerating a parent takes on most kids, it makes sense to place lower-level offenders under mandatory supervision in the community, allowing them to remain connected to family, gainfully employed and available to nurture their children.”

Click here to read more.