Ken Blackwell: “When Father’s Day cards go to jail”

Right on Crime signatory and senior fellow for family empowerment at the Family Research Council Ken Blackwell writes in USA Today: “Given the heavy toll incarcerating a parent takes on most kids, it makes sense to place lower-level offenders under mandatory supervision in the community, allowing them to remain connected to family, gainfully employed and available to nurture their children.”

Click here to read more.

Right on Crime signatories applaud findings of report “Max Out: The Rise in Prison Inmates Released Without Supervision”


Right on Crime signatories applaud findings of report “Max Out: The Rise in Prison Inmates Released Without Supervision”



Austin, TX — Responding to a new national report showing high rates of prison inmates being released without supervision, Right on Crime signatories today called for policies that ensure offenders receive post-prison supervision and support.

The report, by The Pew Charitable Trusts, finds that an increased number of inmates are “maxing out,” meaning that they are serving the entirety of their sentences behind bars and returning to their communities with no supervision by parole officers or other authorities, thus  presenting a higher risk of committing new criminal offenses. In contrast, the report provides evidence from studies in two states that shows offenders who served sentences that concluded with a period of post-prison supervision were 36 percent (New Jersey) and 30 percent (Kentucky) less likely to return to prison for a new crime than offenders who maxed out their sentences behind bars.

Additionally, polling commissioned by Pew showed strong bipartisan support for shorter prison sentences that transition into a period of supervision.

The following statements were issued by Right on Crime signatories in support of the findings and recommendations of the Max Out report:

“Consideration of cost-effective alternatives to incarceration that have lower rates of recidivism and keep the public equally safe is something that I strongly support, and apparently, so do many other Americans.”

— Ken Cuccinelli, Former Attorney General of Virginia

“This polling data shows popular support for reforms that reduce crime and the tax burden through reducing excessively long prison sentences and increasing post-incarceration supervision through parole or probation.  It is encouraging to see sound policy in criminal justice reform also recognized as good politics.”

— Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform


“Max Out affirms what many believe about corrections.  Longer sentences with limited opportunities for parole have dramatically increased costs while decreasing the prospect of successful rehabilitation.”

— Jim Petro, Former Attorney General of Ohio

“Keeping tabs on offenders in the difficult first weeks of transition from prison to the community makes sense. The probation officer has the opportunity to make sure the offender stays on the straight and narrow, and when combined with education, job training, mentors, anger management, and other preparation for release, will make our communities safer.”

— Pat Nolan, Director of the American Conservative Union Foundation’s Center for Criminal Justice Reform

“This groundbreaking report demonstrates that states can enhance public safety by moving away from policies that result in the release of inmates without any supervision. We continue our work to address this issue in Texas and other states and are confident this report will greatly aid these efforts.”

— Marc Levin, Policy Director of Right on Crime

Click here to view the full report.

TIME Magazine: “This Is the One Thing the Right and Left Are Working Together On In Congress”

Right on Crime signatory Grover Norquist, along with Joan Blades, president of MomsRising.org, co-authored an op-ed for TIME Magazine in which they discuss how the left and right are finding common ground on criminal justice reforms.

Louisiana looks to Texas to get right on crime

The Pelican Institute points out that Louisiana is out of step, even with conservative states like Texas and Georgia, which have moved away from prison terms for nonviolent offenders to emphasize rehabilitation.

Click here to read more.

Mississippi HB 585: Recommendations of the Corrections and Criminal Justice Task Force

Why does Mississippi need HB585? Mississippi’s prison population has grown by 17 percent in the last decade, topping 22,600 inmates last year. The state now has the second-highest imprisonment rate in the country, trailing only Louisiana. Without action, these trends will continue and Mississippi prisons will need to house 1,990 more inmates by 2024 – costing taxpayers an additional $266 million.

What will HB 585 do for Mississippi’s criminal justice system? HB 585 will enact “true minimums” to guarantee that nonviolent and violent offenders are never released prior to serving 25 and 50 percent of their sentences, respectively.

Click here to read the full version of “HB 585: Recommendations of the Corrections and Criminal Justice Task Force.”

New poll shows that American support for drug treatment vs. incarceration is on the rise

A survey by Pew Research Center shows that the public is skeptical of sending non-violent drug offenders to prison — and finds that the majority prefer offenders be treated by way of rehabilitative programs. Marc Levin sits down with NPR News to discuss the issue.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Click here to read more from The Crime Report.

Marc Levin, Right on Crime, featured in Texas Monthly


Courtesy of Texas Monthly


Texas Monthly’s Nate Blakeslee highlights Marc Levin and Right on Crime in his article “Why Fewer Prisons Are Good for Texas’s Economy.”

“Levin’s chief message, that incarcerating too many people for too long for nonviolent crimes isn’t a good use of taxpayer funds, has resonated with conservative voters and legislators. He advocates more effective and less costly measures, such as drug courts, which divert low-level drug offenders to treatment programs instead of prison, and more effective use of probation.”

Click here to read the whole interview.

A Second Act for Criminal Justice: Panel at TPPF’s PO2014

Adam Gelb, Director of Public Safety Performance Project at Pew Charitable Trusts, The Honorable Bill Hammond, President and CEO of Texas Association of Business, and Representatives Abel Hererro and Tan Parker of the Texas House of Representatives discuss adult corrections in the Lone Star State.

Chuck DeVore discusses CA reforms with the LaDona Harvey Show

Following his testimony before California’s Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review, Chuck DeVore sat down with KOGO’s LaDona Harvey out of San Digeo to reiterate the prison reform successes of Texas and tell why he believes The Golden State would benefit from following in the footsteps of Right On Crime.

Click here to listen to the interview.

Marc Levin’s research cited in TX Tribune’s ‘TribCast’

During this week’s edition of The Texas Tribune‘s political podcast ‘TribCast,’ ROC policy director Marc Levin’s research regarding cost of incarceration vs. rehabilitation is discussed as the contributors talk about Governor Perry’s marijuana decriminalization remarks.

Click here to listen to the podcast.