Overcriminalization in America: No Home for Justice

All Jack and his wife Jill Barron wanted was a home near their family for retirement. After going through all of the necessary permitting, they purchased the land where they intended to build. But soon the EPA alleged that the land might be a wetland and began restricting building on the site. Eventually the EPA brought felony charges on Jack for bringing gravel on to his property. This sparked a legal fight that threatened Jack with federal prison.

After extensive legal fees and a great deal of time and stress on the part of the couple, a jury decided that the property had not been proved to be a wetland and found Jack not guilty. But the EPA continues to require Jack to restore the property to its original state, prohibiting his development. [Read more...]

This is the first of a series of films that looks at what happens in an overcriminalized society. A couple can lose their life savings in legal fights through overgrown bureaucracy.

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Pat Nolan: Fear of Crime and the Prison Build Up

Pat Nolan, Director of the Center for Criminal Justice Reform at the American Conservative Union Foundation and Right on Crime Director of Outreach, talks about how being a former legislator and having served time in prison has made it clear for him to see the bureaucracy within the criminal justice system. This is a driving factor in his passion for reform. Here, on The Vera Institute “Justice In Focus”, he shares his experience.

 

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Marc Levin testifies before U.S. House Judiciary Commitee

Marc Levin, Policy Director of Right on Crime, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Judiciary Committee on the subject of over-criminalization.

Click here to watch the hearing.

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Levin, Cohen: The End of Penal ‘One-Upmanship’

Right on Crime Policy Director Marc Levin and Policy Analyst Derek Cohen write in The Crime Report:

The National Academies’ exhaustive report, “The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences,” released last month, covers nearly the entire body of scholarship on the causes of the incarceration boom.

The causes, as identified by the authors, derive from a charged political arena favoring longer sentences, the trend towards harsher methods of punishment, and the rapid development of increasingly punitive drug laws.

Certainly, the last four decades of criminal justice policy reflect this.

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Getting Rid of Unnecessary Laws: TPPF’s PO2014

Shannon Edmonds, Director of Governmental Relations at TDCAA, Paul Larkin, Senior Legal Research Fellow at The Heritage Foundation, and Representatives Bryan Hughes and Jeff Leach of the Texas House of Representatives discuss the burden of overcriminalization during the panel “Getting Rid of Unnecessary Laws” at TPPF’s Policy Orientation 2014.

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