Enhancing Public Safety & Right-Sizing Florida’s Criminal Justice System

Texas Public Policy Foundation’s Right on Crime asking the right questions:

Which criminal laws are overlapping, obsolete, overbroad or vague, or lacking a mens rea provision?

What percent of offenders in community corrections and prison are paying the restitution they owe?

Which treatment, education, and work programs most reduce re-offending for each type of offender?

How many low-risk offenders are going to prison?

How many probationers and parolees are revoked for rule violations who could be safely supervised and treated given sufficient resources?

Click here to view the Powerpoint on improving Florida’s Criminal Justice System

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Vikrant Reddy on Florida criminal justice policy

ROC Senior Policy Analyst Vikrant Reddy discusses Florida’s 85% mandatory minimum sentence requirement with Florida’s WFLA 970.

“Time behind bars may be part of what contributes to public safety, but it’s not all of it. There are other factors involved; it’s very complicated.”

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“Conservative Group Continues Push for Criminal Justice Reform”

“Right on Crime aims at reform on both the federal and state levels. The underlying idea is to use prisons for people who would harm society, not for non-violent offenders causing no injury to body or property.”

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Bill Reforming Florida’s Juvenile Justice System Has Some Calling For More Reform

Bob McClure, ROC signatory and president of the James Madison Institute, “applauds the effort” of Florida’s bill to reform juvenile justice, but believes that more can be done.

“We feel it important to codify the principles and practices borne out by research in Florida’s juvenile justice program that saves money and ensures positive outcomes for children.”

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James Madison Institute “A Tale of Two States”

On September 24, The James Madison Institute hosted a forum in partnership with The Florida State University’s Project on Accountable Justice and St. Petersburg College Institute for Strategic Policy Solutions to discuss what Florida can learn from Georgia’s successful juvenile justice reforms. The public forum was titled “A Tale of Two Cities: What Can Florida Learn From Georgia’s Criminal and Juvenile Justice Reforms?” and featured The Honorable Michael P. Boggs, Judge, Georgia Court of Appeals, Co-Chair, Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform, The Honorable Jay Neal, Member, Georgia House of Representatives, W. Thomas Worthy, Deputy Executive Counsel, and Georgia Governor Nathan Deal, Co-Chair, Georgia Council on Criminal Justice Reform.


Click here to watch the full video.

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